Hannah Arendt, “Reflections on Violence”

It is, I think, a rather sad reflection on the present state of political science that our language does not distinguish between such key terms as power, strength, force, might, authority, and, finally, violence—all of which refer to distinct phenomena. To use them as synonyms not only indicates a certain deafness to linguistic meanings, which would be serious enough, but has resulted in a kind of blindness with respect to the realities they correspond to. Behind the apparent confusion lies a firm conviction that the most crucial political issue is, and always has been, the question of Who rules Whom? Only after one eliminates this disastrous reduction of public affairs to the business of dominion will the original data concerning human affairs appear or rather reappear in their authentic diversity.

Source : The New York Review of Books, February 27, 1969 Issue

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Margaret McKay Tee

Category : Education, Students
Margaret McKay Tee

Margaret McKay Tee was born in 1882 and raised in Pennsylvania until her family moved to Colorado. Following her education at Colorado College, she

Mario Puzo

Category : Students, Writing
Mario Puzo

Born in New York City in 1920, writer Mario Puzo wrote a number of popular novels about the Mafia. He is most famous for

Maurice Natanson

Maurice Natanson

Maurice Alexander Natanson (1924–1996) was an American philosopher “who helped introduce the work of Jean-Paul Sartre and Edmund Husserl in the United States”[2] He

Allan Kaprow

Category : Arts, Students
Allan Kaprow

Allan Kaprow, (born Aug. 23, 1927, Atlantic City, N.J., U.S.—died April 5, 2006, Encinitas, Calif.), American performance artist, theoretician, and instructor who invented the

James Baldwin

Category : Race, Students, Writing
James Baldwin

  Photo: MDCarchives – Own work. Web. 21 Oct 2014. Although he spent a great deal of his life abroad, James Baldwin always remained a

Anatole Broyard

Category : Classroom, Students, Writing
Anatole Broyard

Photo: Anatole Broyard. Communications and External Affairs (CEA). New School Archives and Special Collections Digital Archive. Web. 22 Oct 2014.   Anatole Paul Broyard (July

W. H. Auden

Category : Classroom, Students, Writing
W. H. Auden

Auden was an Anglo-American poet and one of the leading literary figures of the 20th century. Wystan Hugh Auden was born in York on

W.H. Auden, “Shakespeare”

Category : Classroom, Students, Writing

Auden gave the following mimeographed final examination in his Saturday afternoon class for the students taking the course for credit in the fall term. Part B of the examination, which Ansen wrote in by hand with the comment “unexpected,” was dictated by Auden in class.

Lecture and Exam, The New School (1946)

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James Baldwin, “The Creative Process”

Category : Arts, Students, Writing

Perhaps the primary distinction of the artist is that he must actively cultivate that state which most men, necessarily, must avoid; the state of being alone. That all men are, when the chips are down, alone, is a banality—a banality because it is very frequently stated, but very rarely, on the evidence, believed. Most of us are not compelled to linger with the knowledge of our aloneness, for it is a knowledge that can paralyze all action in this world. There are, forever, swamps to be drained, cities to be created, mines to be exploited, children to be fed. None of these things can be done alone. But the conquest of the physical world is not man’s only duty. He is also enjoined to conquer the great wilderness of himself. The precise role of the artist, then, is to illuminate that darkness, blaze roads through that vast forest, so that we will not, in all our doing, lose sight of its purpose, which is, after all, to make the world a more human dwelling place.

Source: Creative America, Ridge Press, 1962.

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James Baldwin, “If Black English Isn’t a Language, Then Tell Me, What Is?”

Category : Race, Students, Writing

St. Paul de Vence, France – The argument concerning the use, or the status, or the reality, of black english is rooted in American history and has absolutely nothing to do with the question the argument supposes itself to be posing. The argument has nothing to do with language itself but with the role of language. Language, incontestably, reveals the speaker. Language, also, far more dubiously, is meant to define the other – and, in this case, the other is refusing to be defined by a language that has never been able to recognize him.

Source: The New York Times (29 July 1979)

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James Baldwin, “Notes of a native son”

Category : Race, Students, Writing

On the 19th of July, in 1943, my father died. On the same day, a few hours later, his last child was born. Over a month before this, while all our energies were concentrated in waiting for those events, there had been, in Detroit, on of the bloodiest race riots of the century. A few hours after my father’s funeral, while lay in state in the undertaker’s chapel, a race riot broke out in Harlem. On the morning of the 3rd of August, we drove my father to the graveyard through a wilderness of smashed plate glass.

Source: Beacon Press, 1955.

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