Thomas Hart Benton

Category : Arts, Buildings, Murals
Thomas Hart Benton

Thomas Hart Benton and assistants restoring his mural (profile). 1968. The New School Mural Collection. New School Archives and Special Collections Digital Archive. Web.

Thomas Hart Benton, “Mural for 66 W. 12th Street Building” (1931)

Category : Arts, Buildings, Murals

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Douglas Haskell, “Architecture: The New School”

Category : Buildings

It must be that the New School for Social Research was designed for the up-to-date woman. It is bold just where she is bold. The flat painted walls inside, with their simple and assured tones of red, blue, and yellow, are hers, in strong contrast to the interiors of buildings done for her husband, which are either plain tame or else vulgar-gaudy like the lobby of the Daily News. The whole picture, outside as well as in, is uncompromisingly “new school,” where the man would have inclined to tone it down or fudge it up.

Consider, for a moment, how “modernism” entered the United States. It was certainly through the woman. First she bought smart new gowns from Poiret or Chanel, or at least the very best copies; then her couturiers over here began dressing their windows with cork and with bright new chromium furniture; eventually she herself’risked a bar, and then a dining room, and finally a whole large building in the new mode.

Source: The Nation (25 February 1931): 221-23

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Shepard Vogelgesang, “The New School for Social Research”

Category : Buildings

The New School was founded on the perception of the demand for adult mental occupation and expansion in an age which, among the machine products, has been rapidly fabricating leisure. The client, Dr. Alvin Johnson, is an educator of bread information and liberal ideas. His experiment was to give opportunity for following many interests in this leisure time. It met with a degree of success which demanded more ample housing. What he wanted of his architect was the embodiment of the school requirements – simply, technically and beautifully, within the economic means at hand. There was no question of recalling the past, the building was to function in the present and if possible to forecast the future.

Source: The Architectural Record (February 1931): 139-50

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