Julie Meyer

Julie Meyer

By Carmen Hendershott, Librarian, The New School Julie Meyer, a pioneering scholar in the sociology of labor, was born in Nuremberg, Germany, on January

John Watson

Category : History, People, Psychology
John Watson

Author: Carmen Hendershott, Librarian, The New School John Watson (1878-1958) is remembered today as the flamboyant founder and promoter of behaviorist psychology. Born in

Hannah Arendt

Hannah Arendt

Many at The New School would agree that it is difficult to graduate from the university without hearing the name Hannah Arendt. Working primarily

Ira Katznelson

Category : History, Politics
Ira Katznelson

Ira Katznelson (born 1944) is a leading American political scientist and historian, noted for his influential research on the liberal state, inequality, social knowledge,

James Harvey Robinson

Category : Founding, History
James Harvey Robinson

James Harvey Robinson, (born June 29, 1863, Bloomington, Ill., U.S.—died Feb. 16, 1936, New York City), U.S. historian, one of the founders of the

Kurt Riezler

Kurt Riezler

Kurt Riezler (February 11, 1882 – September 5, 1955) was a German philosopher and diplomat. A top-level cabinet adviser in the German Empire and

Gerda Lerner

Category : History, Women
Gerda Lerner

Gerda Lerner (April 30, 1920 – January 2, 2013) was a historian, author and teacher. She was a professor emeritus of history at the

Charles Beard

Category : Economics, Founding, History
Charles Beard

Charles Beard. Communications and External Affairs (CEA). New School Archives and Special Collections Digital Archive. Web. 28 Oct 2014. Charles Austin Beard (1874 –

Charles Beard, “A Statement”

Category : Founding, History

It has been insinuated by certain authorities of Columbia University that I resigned in a fit of unjustified petulance, and I, theretofore, beg to submit the following statement:
1. My first real experience with the inner administration of the university came with the retirement of Professor john W. Burgess. For some time before his withdrawal, his work in American constitutional law had been carried by Professor X and it was the desire of the members of the faculty that the latter should be appointed Ruggles Professor to succeed Mr. Burgess. But Mr. X had published a book in which he justified criticism of the Supreme Court as a means of bringing our constitutional law into harmony with our changing social and economic life.

Source: The New Republic (29 December 1917): 249-51

Read more HERE.

Charles Beard, An Economic Interpretation of the Constitution of the United States

Category : Economics, Founding, History

The following pages are frankly fragmentary. They are designed to suggest new lines of historical research rather than to treat the subject in an exhaustive fashion. This apology is not intended as an anticipation of the criticism of reviewers, but as a confession of fact. No one can appreciate more fully than I do how much of the work here outlined remains to be done. The records of The Treasury Department at Washington, now used for the first time in connection with a study of the formation of the Constitution, furnish a field for many years’ research, to say nothing of the other records, printed and unprinted, which throw light upon the economic conditions of the United States between 1783 – 1787.

Source: NY: Macmillian, 1921

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Victoria Hattam, “History, Agency and Political Change”

Category : History, Politics

Many political scientists have turned to historical research as means of clarifying the constraints shaping contemporary political action. Polsky’s self-identified pessimism in this forum captures this view of political history elegantly when he identifies notions of “path dependence” and “policy legacies” as key contributions of historical research. The focus for many historically oriented political scientists has been on identifying the ways in which political institutions and policies have provided a distinctive set of incentives and constraints that have, in turn, structured subsequent political choice.

Source: Polity 32.3 (2000): 333-338

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Gerda Lerner, “Placing Women in History: Definitions and Challenges”

Category : History, Students, Women

In the brief span of five years in which American historians have begun to develop women’s history as an independent field, they have sought to find a conceptual framework and a methodology appropriate to the task. The first level at which historians, trained in traditional history, approach women’s history is by writing the history of “women worthies” or “compensatory history.” Who are the women missing from history? Who are the women of achievement and what did they achieve? The resulting history of “notable women” does not tell us much about those activities in which most women engaged, nor does it tell us about the significance of women’s activities to society as a whole.

Source: The Majority Finds its Past (1981)

Read more here.