Hannah Arendt, “Reflections on Violence”

It is, I think, a rather sad reflection on the present state of political science that our language does not distinguish between such key terms as power, strength, force, might, authority, and, finally, violence—all of which refer to distinct phenomena. To use them as synonyms not only indicates a certain deafness to linguistic meanings, which would be serious enough, but has resulted in a kind of blindness with respect to the realities they correspond to. Behind the apparent confusion lies a firm conviction that the most crucial political issue is, and always has been, the question of Who rules Whom? Only after one eliminates this disastrous reduction of public affairs to the business of dominion will the original data concerning human affairs appear or rather reappear in their authentic diversity.

Source : The New York Review of Books, February 27, 1969 Issue

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Hannah Arendt

Hannah Arendt

Many at The New School would agree that it is difficult to graduate from the university without hearing the name Hannah Arendt. Working primarily

G. A. Borgese

Category : Philosophy, Politics
G. A. Borgese

by Michela Beatrice Ferri (Ph.D. Philosophy, 2012, State University of Milan, Italy) Giuseppe Antonio Borgese was born in Polizzi Generosa, Palermo, on November 12,

Ira Katznelson

Category : History, Politics
Ira Katznelson

Ira Katznelson (born 1944) is a leading American political scientist and historian, noted for his influential research on the liberal state, inequality, social knowledge,

Frieda Wunderlich

Frieda Wunderlich

Photo: Frieda Wunderlich. Communications and External Affairs (CEA). New School Archives and Special Collections Digital Archive. Web. 12 Nov 2014. Autor: Carmen Hendershott, Librarian, The

Hans Staudinger

Hans Staudinger

Hans Staudinger (born 16 August 1889 in Worms, Germany; died 25 February 1980 in New York City, NY) was a politician of the Social

Reinhold Niebuhr

Category : Politics
Reinhold Niebuhr

Reinhold Niebuhr, (born June 21, 1892, Wright City, Mo., U.S.—died June 1, 1971, Stockbridge, Mass.), American Protestant theologian who had extensive influence on political

James Miller

Category : Politics
James Miller

James Miller is the chair of Liberal Studies and professor of politics at The New School for Social Research. He is the author of

Horace Kallen

Category : Politics
Horace Kallen

Born in the then German Bernstadt (now Bierutów), Silesia to Jacob David Kallen and Esther Rebecca (Glazier), an Orthodox rabbi and his wife, Kallen

Leon Festinger

Category : Politics, Sociology
Leon Festinger

Photo: Leon Festinger, photographed at the University of Minnesota, USA, 1954. (C) ESTATE OF FRANCIS BELLO/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY. Web 31st Oct 2014. Leon Festinger.

Raoul Aglion, “French Colonial Policy”

Category : Ecole_Libre, Politics

France, the nation having the second largest colonial empire in the world, is the country bearing the largest responsibility in Africa. The territories administered by France on the Dark Continent may be divided into two separate and distinct parts: 1 “White Africa,” 2 “Black Africa.”

Source: World Affairs 107.2 (Jun 1944): 78-81

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G. A. Borgese, “The Intellectual Origins of Fascism”

Category : Politics, Sociology

The first and second rules of reasoning, as formulated by Newton and repeated by popular physicists down to the present, read as follows: “We are to admit no more causes of natural things than such as are both true and sufficient to explain their appearance. . . . Therefore to the same natural effects we must, as far as possible, assign the same causes. As to respiration in a man and in a beast; the descent of stones in Europe and America; the light of our culinary fire and of the sun; the reflection of light in the earth, and in the planets.” Such rules are valid for human as well as for natural history, and therefore the reasons that explain Italian fascism must be good, at least in their main outlines, for fascism too, and vice versa, or they are not reasons at all.

Source: Social Research, Vol. 1, No. 4 (NOVEMBER, 1934), pp. 458-485

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