Hans Speier

Hans Speier

In 1933, Professor Speier came to the United States from Berlin and was one of 10 intellectuals who formed the University in Exile and

Jakob Marschak

Jakob Marschak

Jacob Marschak (23 July 1898 – 27 July 1977) was a Russian-American economist, known as “the Father of Econometrics”. Jacob Marschak (until 1933 Jakob)

Robert Heilbroner

Category : Economics, Philosophy
Robert Heilbroner

Heilbroner was born in New York City to a wealthy German Jewish family; his father Louis Heilbroner founded the men’s clothing retailer Weber and

Duncan Foley

Category : Economics
Duncan Foley

Duncan Foley is Leo Model Professor of Economics at the New School for Social Research in New York, and an external professor at the

Arthur Feiler

Arthur Feiler

Photo: Arthur Feiler, Unknown author. Reproduction in Werner Becker, Demokratie des sozialen Rechts, ISBN 3-7881-1626-9 Bio: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Feiler (translate)

Charles Beard

Category : Economics, Founding, History
Charles Beard

Charles Beard. Communications and External Affairs (CEA). New School Archives and Special Collections Digital Archive. Web. 28 Oct 2014. Charles Austin Beard (1874 –

Charles Abrams, “The Subsidy and Housing”

Category : Economics, Urban Studies

The subsidy is only a single aspect of housing policy; yet the form it ultimately takes will influence more than the housing program alone. In all its long history, both here and abroad, the subsidy has never been more significant than it is currently. It involves more than monetary outlay. The kind of economy in which we are to live may be influenced by the policy we devise for its dispensation.

Source: The Journal of Land & Public Utility Economics 22.2 (May 1946): 131- 139

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Charles Beard, An Economic Interpretation of the Constitution of the United States

Category : Economics, Founding, History

The following pages are frankly fragmentary. They are designed to suggest new lines of historical research rather than to treat the subject in an exhaustive fashion. This apology is not intended as an anticipation of the criticism of reviewers, but as a confession of fact. No one can appreciate more fully than I do how much of the work here outlined remains to be done. The records of The Treasury Department at Washington, now used for the first time in connection with a study of the formation of the Constitution, furnish a field for many years’ research, to say nothing of the other records, printed and unprinted, which throw light upon the economic conditions of the United States between 1783 – 1787.

Source: NY: Macmillian, 1921

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Karl Brandt, “The Orientation of Agricultural Economics”

When I chose this subject I had no ambition to shoulder the burden of a critical survey of argicultural economics today-45 years after the founding of our Association. Others have found that such an undertaking requires an extensive committee, large funds, and years of work. Nor was I prompted by misgivings about our profession’s performance in the pursuit of truth or the services it renders. Repeatedly, in recent years, I have seen the work done by American and Canadian agricultural economists from observation points in other parts of the world. I am the more profoundly impressed by what has been achieved within one generation, how much is going on, and how much better public service may confidently be expected in coming years.

Source: Journal of Farm Economics  37.5 (Dec 1955): 415-437

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 Arthur Feiler, “The Evolution of the Consumer”

In the beginning, on the sixth day of His work, God created man-as a consumer. And God blessed him, and said: “Behold, I have given you every herb bearing seed, which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree, in the which is the fruit of a tree yielding the seed; to you it shall be for meat … And the Lord God planted a garden eastward in Eden; and there he put the man whom he had formed. And out of the ground made the Lord God to grow every tree that is pleasant to the sight, and good for food.” Those were the paradisean days, before the serpent beguiled the woman and Adam and Eve ate of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. From that time on, God’s curse has been on the world: “In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread.” Out of the knowledge of good and evil grew-the producer. And the ground ever since has brought forth “thorns also and thistles.”

Source: The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 196 (1938): 1-8  

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Duncan Foley, “Rationality and Ideology in Economics”

Category : Economics

Robert Heilbroner has had a long-standing interest in the issues of rationality and ideology in shaping economic theory (see, particularly, Heilbroner, 1988, chaps. 1 and 8, and Heilbroner, 1999, chap. 11). Heilbroner argues that the conception of rationality underlying economic theory is specific to the emergence of capitalism as a mode of production and that economics as a science cannot avoid confronting issues (especially the distribution of material wealth and power) that are inherently political and ideological. This essay explores these issues in the spirit of Heilbroner’s concerns.

Source: Social Research 71.2 (2004): 329

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Robert Heilbroner, “The Savage Society of Thorsten Veblen,”

Category : Economics, Philosophy

One hundred and twenty-five years had now passed since The Wealth of Nations appeared in 1776, and in that span of time it seemed as if the great economists had left no aspect of the world unexamined: its magnificence or its squalor, its naivete or its sometimes sinister overtones, its grandiose achievements in technology or its often mean shortcomings in human values.

Source: The Worldly Philosophers (NY: Simon and Schuster, 1998)

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